2022 was the year that life returned. Over the next 12 months, however, architects and designers will combine individuality and wellness with sustainability to create a ‘new and improved’ normal.

Viva Magenta has been named Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2023, signalling a rise in individualism and self-expression, along with textiles, texture and treasured objects. Photo: Decorex

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Viva Magenta has been named Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2023, signalling a rise in individualism and self-expression, along with textiles, texture and treasured objects. Photo: Decorex

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This time last year, predicted 2022 trends included bold colours, divided spaces, time spent outdoors and a greater understanding of the then-little-known metaverse. While these trends are very much still at the forefront of architects’ and designers’ minds, of course, if I take another look into my carbon-neutral, ethically-sourced crystal ball, I can see a few subtle developments for the year ahead. There’s no need to cross my palm with silver first, however, so let’s take a look ahead at what the coming year will hold…

Magenta at Lulu (top), Hadi Teherani’s ochre red moodboard (middle) and Laurella Store's dusty pink (bottom). Photos: Francisco Nogueira (top), Jonas von der Hude (middle), Patrick Lewiński (bottom)

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Magenta at Lulu (top), Hadi Teherani’s ochre red moodboard (middle) and Laurella Store's dusty pink (bottom). Photos: Francisco Nogueira (top), Jonas von der Hude (middle), Patrick Lewiński (bottom)

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Colour of the Year

Colour alone is said to be the most important design element, the first aspect of an interior you notice, or don’t notice, perhaps. So it’s no surprise that the annual announcement of Pantone’s reported ‘Colour of the Year’ gets almost as much attention as naming a new Pope. Those eagerly awaiting the news will already be aware, of course, it’s magenta. ‘Welcome to the Magentaverse,’ says Pantone of the colour. Far brighter and bolder than previous years (2022: Very Peri, a deep, lilac blue and 2021: a warm but dull Ultimate Gray – alongside Illuminating yellow), magenta ‘encourages experimentation and self-expression without constraint’ says Pantone, and its new title signifies the bravery that contemporary interiors and product lines will make this year.

Not all individuals are the same, however, and for those who’d prefer to look for their colour choices elsewhere, the general consensus is that natural and organic, but calming tones like mustard yellow, ochre reds and dusty brick pinks will rule the year, focusing on individual personalities and characterful environments, but also promoting wellness and relaxation.

Raw, exposed surfaces at the Moritz M-Store (top), and Vitra’s showroom (middle) and insulating curtain partitions (bottom). Photos: Adrià Goulà (top), Vitra (middle), Time & Style (bottom)

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Raw, exposed surfaces at the Moritz M-Store (top), and Vitra’s showroom (middle) and insulating curtain partitions (bottom). Photos: Adrià Goulà (top), Vitra (middle), Time & Style (bottom)

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Textured or reused surfaces

Colour trends are important, of course, not just when faced with a decision on paint samples, but also for designers selecting fabrics and product colours, too. But a bigger trend, perhaps, more so than any one colour, will be natural, textured surfaces.

The decision to ignore colour choice entirely and leave surfaces either as they are, warts and all – or rather exposed pipework, unfinished plaster and brickwork – or apply the natural warmth and character of more sustainable, textured materials like wood, textiles, ceramics and cork, will rise in popularity in 2023, rooted in the desire for more sustainable and reused environments.

  • BEATRIX | High-Back Easy Chair

    BEATRIX | High-Back Easy Chair

    Ritzwell

  • Brasilia

    Brasilia

    Minotti

Ritzwell’s Beatrix chair (top) and Minotti's Brasilia seating (middle) have proven mid-century style sustainability, while Morbern’s vinyl leather and animal hide alternative is both durable and vegan

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Ritzwell’s Beatrix chair (top) and Minotti's Brasilia seating (middle) have proven mid-century style sustainability, while Morbern’s vinyl leather and animal hide alternative is both durable and vegan

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Durable sustainability

After a year when the realities of climate change started to hit many of us for the first time, 2023 could see a huge shift in both designer and consumer habits. As more consumers demand regulated sustainability assurances, manufacturers will need to pay real and lasting attention to their design and production models, rather than simply offsetting and greenwashing their way through the market.

While considering what goes into the products they buy, consumers will also pay greater attention to how long they last. Landfill guilt will point preferences towards products with a proven track record of timelessness and durability.

  • Silky Seal 1211 Glossy Velours Starlight

    Silky Seal 1211 Glossy Velours Starlight

    OBJECT CARPET

Coloured and patterned fabrics will brighten interiors (top) while collated, curated artworks will group together (top) and stand out (bottom) on walls

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Coloured and patterned fabrics will brighten interiors (top) while collated, curated artworks will group together (top) and stand out (bottom) on walls

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Artwork all around us

An era of guilt-free self-expression will free us of the shackles many feel surrounding their own design choices, and invest in more artwork. While this all spells a good year for picture hook manufacturers, we’ll also fill our floors, stack our tables and stock our shelves with meaningful personal objects and select textiles with vintage patterns.

Rugs, blankets, cushions and lampshades with colour and patterned canvases will all make a comeback, while the resurgence of curtains – partly for their insulating properties – will see them applied in front of walls and as partitions too. The artistic mise en scène will even stretch to statement ceramic collections, with what was once considered cluttered and messy, now becoming an artistically curated space.

Products like outdoor kitchens (top), outdoor showers (middle) and shading gazebos (bottom) will help us spend our time outdoors more comfortably. Photo: Rafael Game (bottom)

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Products like outdoor kitchens (top), outdoor showers (middle) and shading gazebos (bottom) will help us spend our time outdoors more comfortably. Photo: Rafael Game (bottom)

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Finding comfort in the outdoors

This year’s record-breaking temperatures will have an effect on design choices for the next. Not just those looking to make use of longer summers and warmer springs and autumns with outdoor seating and kitchens, but also by ensuring hot weather at the more extreme end is more comfortable to handle. Outdoor showers and shade-granting pergolas will be the outdoor products to have this summer.

Unused spare rooms will go full Goblin Mode, transformed into self-indulgent listening rooms (top), reading rooms (middle), home gyms (bottom) and more. Photo: Simone Vogel (top), Jack Lovel (middle)

Top architecture and design trends for 2023 | News

Unused spare rooms will go full Goblin Mode, transformed into self-indulgent listening rooms (top), reading rooms (middle), home gyms (bottom) and more. Photo: Simone Vogel (top), Jack Lovel (middle)

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  • NOHrD Wall Oak

    NOHrD Wall Oak

    WaterRower

Hobby rooms to spend ‘spare’ time in

More time spent at home this year has meant many of us have taken up new hobbies. Along with the rise and acceptance of family video calls, more previously unused ‘spare’ rooms will be converted into self-serving hobby rooms in 2023. Part of a movement towards making wellness-focused design decisions, we’ll add listening rooms with wall-to-wall vinyl and comfy leather chairs, craft rooms with wide desks and plenty of storage, or even home theatres, libraries, games rooms, wine cellars and pantries. Whatever your passion, 2023 could finally be the year you find space for it.

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