Newsletter 05.2009


Dear Readers

More than 1300 selected new products from Salone del Mobile are now available for you to view in our Architonic Online Library!

For over a year now ClassiCon has been marketing the furniture of Brazilian design legend Sergio Rodrigues in Europe. We met him in Milan to talk about his work, and we also interviewed the Belgian designer Alain Gilles, who presented the 'Big Table' he has created for Bonaldo at the Salone.

In addition our May Newsletter contains further interviews with exhibitors, architects and designers.

Be inspired!

Your Architonic Team
Zurich | Milan | Berlin | Barcelona | Copenhagen | London | Miami
 
 
Milano News
Collected novelties from the Salone del Mobile and Euroluce Milano 2009
    Milano News
 
 
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Interviews Milano and Euroluce 2009
 
 
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Interview Oscar Tusquets, Bd Barcelona Design
 
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Interview Shigeru Ban, Artek
 
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Interview Henrik Kjellberg
 
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Interview José Palau, Andreu World
 
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Interview Marta Sala, Azucena
 
 
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Entirely Brazilian
An interview with Sergio Rodrigues
 

At this year's Milan furniture fair the German manufacturer ClassiCon presented some famous classic creations by Sergio Rodrigues, a real doyen of Brazilian furniture design. With his work Rodrigues managed to give Brazilian design its own identity and with his casual 'Mole' armchair he attracted well-deserved international recognition - "modern furniture in the spirit of Brazilian tradition," as Oskar Niemeyer remarked. From this year on ClassiCon will be marketing some of these classics. We had the honour of interviewing Sergio Rodrigues in Milan.
 
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Interview Sergio Rodrigues

Mr Rodrigues, you both witnessed and played a major part in the development and transformation of Brazilian design. What was your motivation in beginning to design furniture in the middle of last century?
Until the Forties, furniture design in Brazil still showed strong influence of the colonial and baroque styles, in other words European influences. And even the initial more innovative designs were still clearly oriented towards modern European and American design. People were still looking very much across the Atlantic to the Old World. The first architect who really began to give Brazilian design its own identity and to create his designs against the cultural background of Brazil was Joaquim Tenreiro.

To some extent your designs make an archaic impression. Are the materials and their processing perhaps the reaction to limitations in the available manufacturing technology?
Yes, whereas Tenreiro's models to some extent required European processing methods, I wanted to design something that would be entirely Brazilian. My furniture was to be clearly identifiable in cultural terms and communicate a Brazilian identity. This is why I used typical materials such as leather and wood, and designs which could be produced with local resources. That was my philosophy.


 

...which you put into practice with your own company, 'Oca Industries'.
Oca was an institution which aimed at providing a platform for modern Brazilian product culture, whether it's furniture, art or industrial design. We soon made a name as a studio for interior design and stage sets, as well as an art gallery, which promoted contemporary Brazilian design. By the way, 'Oca' is the Indian word for 'House'.
 
 
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"Design as a second life"
An interview with Belgian designer Alain Gilles
 

With his playful design Alain Gilles creates entire worlds which are conspicuous for their colour. As the product of a conscious exploration of the possible multiple personalities of an individual object, Gilles has now created a piece of furniture which is designed along strict but at the same time geometrically free lines. The concepts of movement and durability are integrated into the design process of the 'Big Table', which was created for Bonaldo and presented at Salone del Mobile 2009. The result is a fusion of function and sculpture.

Born in Brussels in 1970, Alain Gilles studied political science and marketing management and worked in finance before dedicating himself to the study of product design. In 2007 Gilles established his own studio.

  "Design as a second life"  
Big Table by Alain Gilles for Bonaldo 2009
 
 
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A daily dose of Architonic = dailytonic.com
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More Articles from «News & Trends»
 
Cool & Fresh 2009
Impressions of the Salone Satellite 2009
  More Articles from «News & Trends»

This year it was easier to find your way round Salone Satellite than last year, for the very good reason that the really good things were relatively easy to identify.
DMY Berlin
 

The five-day DMY Festival, which has now firmly established itself as a central forum for the design scene, takes place once a year...
Grand Pari(s)
President Sarkozy announces revival plan for Paris
 

"We have to think big", said President Sarkozy on 30 April 2009 at the opening of the exhibition at the Palais de Chaillot, where ten of thirty-seven future models for the re-design of Paris are on display.
Datenbank zum Anfassen
 

Ein Archiv spezieller Art wurde jüngst mit dem Materialarchiv ins Leben gerufen.
Das Materialarchiv ist eine Symbiose aus Online-Datenbank und einer Materialsammlung zum Anfassen als auch des haptischen Erlebens von Werkstoffen.
"The Bauhaus comes from Weimar"
Klassik Stiftung Weimar celebrates the 90th birthday of the founding of the Bauhaus
 

On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the founding of the State Bauhaus Weimar, the Klassik Stiftung Weimar is presenting a large overview exhibition, "The Bauhaus comes from Weimar" from 1 April until 5 July, focussing on the early years of the legendary school of design.

Chris Redfern: Echoes of Ettore
In the second of our three-part intermission, we meet long-time Sottsass Associati principal designer Chris Redfern
 

Chris Redfern shouldn't worry himself about youth. The British-born designer is only 36. For one-third of his life he has worked with Ettore Sottsass. And since Sottsass' death in December 2007, Redfern has deftly led the studio in closing one chapter and starting a new one.
 
 
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