Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

By the harbourside in Copenhagen, an old coal crane has been turned into an upscale retreat and meeting room, where visitors can enjoy exclusive Danish design with a beautiful view. THE KRANE has been realized by owner Klaus Kastbjerg and architect Mads Møller from Arcgency. It is an immersive, multi-sensory experience intensifed by the outdoor impression of the sea, sky, harbour and panoramic views over Copenhagen. A luxurious and unique retreat for two.

THE KRANE includes a reception area on the ground floor and a meeting room called the GLASS BOX on the frst floor. The second floor includes a spa with a glass wall and two tubs, so visitors can enjoy the view and good conversation. In the top is a retreat called the KRANE ROOM with a lounge and terrace covered in Dinesen Douglas outdoor planks.

The project remains true to the history of the crane that was once used for loading coal. The black look ensures that visitors are not distracted by the interior, but can focus on the exterior. THE KRANE has been furnished with Danish high-end brands within lifestyle and design, selected for their signature style, impeccable quality and craftsmanship. But at the same time, it has an understated elegance to it, including only the essentials.

A great mix of materials has been used for the project. Leather, wood, stone and steel. The furniture is custommade to ft the concept and the dimensions. Dinesen Douglas planks have been used for flooring, ceiling and wall cladding, and the fnish is a special made ‘megablack’ oil, which gives THE KRANE a more intensive look. In the meeting room, however, the planks are kept light and have been fnished with lye and white oil. Everything is handcrafted by artisans as a tribute to Denmark’s expertise in craftsmanship.

If this crane could talk…
There’s a story behind how the crane became THE KRANE. Kastbjerg, a passionate, pivotal figure driving numerous projects on Copenhagen’s waterfronts, such as Paper Island (PapirØen), THE SILO, HARBOUR HOUSE and THE SIGNING ROOM, explains it best. “The harbour came with two cranes. When Paustian first opened its doors, they were having a big reception and the architect Jørn Utzon, who also designed the Sydney Opera House, asked if we could please move the crane to a more beautiful position. As Jørn stood on the quay directing us, we lifted the crane right there and then and moved it to the perfect spot.

Years later when we started building HARBOUR HOUSE with Jørn and his architect sons Jan and Kim, we actually designed it around the crane. That was the first crane, which we transformed in 2005 into a place just meant for meetings called THE SIGNING ROOM. But we found ourselves wanting a nice place to sleep, maybe a spa and more. There was an old grain silo, which we ​converted into luxury apartments called THE SILO. We also renovated Paper Island into a cultural destination, involving the transformation of a 1​5,0​00 m2 former paper warehouse​ into showroom offices. Home to design house &tradition, Calvin Klein, Hilfiger, Henrik Vibskov and others, including art galleries, exhibition halls and Copenhagen Street Food. That’s in addition to other architecture and design projects in the works.“

“Through it all, the second crane on the harbour remained standing with an uncertain future. With its history and such incredible views of the water… So I decided to have it reincarnated into something contemporary but with soul.”​ ​

Every moment of your experience at THE KRANE has been mapped out to the millimetre. From a designated car with a concierge who meets you at the airport, acclimates you to the amenities and brings you breakfast every morning. To the interior design conceived by Møller to be soothing and inviting. To the curated, high-end furniture and the discrete construction of functionalities cleverly concealed for you to discover. Ascending the drawbridge-like staircase, moving through the steel structure gives you a feeling of leaving the ground. Arriving on the highest terrace, you feel on top of the world, looking out to the edge of the horizon.

Klaus Kastbjerg

Arcgency

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×

Photographer: Rasmus Hjortshøj

The Krane by Arcgency | Therapy centres / spas ×