Key facts

Product:
523 Tabouret Méribel
Family:
523-524 Tabouret
Manufacturer:
Cassina
Designer:
Charlotte Perriand
Architonic ID:
1195656
Country:
Italy
Designed:
1961
Launched:
2013
Groups:
Seating-Stools
Tables-Side tables

Product description

H 40cm Ø 33cm

Another version of the milking stool, taller than the Tabouret Berger, it was created for a chalet in Méribel, France and inspired by local interior architecture. The legs are cut and geometric. Created in wood with a Canaletto walnut, natural oak or black-stained oak finish.

Product family

Concept

The Modern Movement was marked by a lively debate on how to reconcile regional traditions with the universal language of rationalism. Charlotte Perriand made a key contribution to this discussion by her return to simple materials and elementary forms, inspired in particular by Alpine architecture. “La manque de materiaux donnait de l’imagination”, wrote Charlotte in her memoirs, recalling that it was precisely the simplicity of materials that stimulated creativity in mountainous and rural populations.

Her great passion for the mountains is clear in two models that Cassina has revisited for the first time. The “Tabouret Méribel” and the “Tabouret Berger” both offer an elegant stylization of the traditional milking stool, a synthesis of a traditional model and universal form, deliberately less “rustic” and ideal for a contemporary home.

The tabourets, available in two different heights and three different essences of wood, can be used individually, in a group or also as small tables, enabling the creation of lively and dynamic arrangements. The art de vivre according to Charlotte Perriand is, above all else, about freedom of expression and movement.

This view of life and design is quite apparent in the “Table en forme libre” series from which Cassina presents a new edition. With its rounded and asymmetrical form, this tables is suitable for even the smallest spaces and as it is free of rough edges, it can comfortably seat more people. The plasticity of its form enhances the allure of the wood, evident in all its natural beauty, as if it were eroded by the wind and water.